Daily Mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards & XSS Web Security Problem

Daily mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards & XSS Web Security Problem

 

Website Description:
“The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-market tabloid newspaper owned by the Daily Mail and General Trust. First published in 1896 by Lord Northcliffe, it is the United Kingdom’s second biggest-selling daily newspaper after The Sun. Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982. Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively. The Daily Mail was Britain’s first daily newspaper aimed at the newly-literate “lower-middle class market resulting from mass education, combining a low retail price with plenty of competitions, prizes and promotional gimmicks”, and was the first British paper to sell a million copies a day. It was at the outset a newspaper for women, the first to provide features especially for them, and as of the second-half of 2013 had a 54.77% female readership, the only British newspaper whose female readers constitute more than 50% of its demographic. It had an average daily circulation of 1,708,006 copies in March 2014. Between July and December 2013 it had an average daily readership of approximately 3.951 million, of whom approximately 2.503 million were in the ABC1 demographic and 1.448 million in the C2DE demographic. Its website has more than 100 million unique visitors per month.” (Wikipedia)

One of its website’s Alexa rank is 93 on January 01 2015. The website is one of the most popular websites in the United Kingdom.

The Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards problem has not been patched, while the XSS problem has been patched.

 

 

 

(1) Daily mail Registration Page Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards Web Security Problem

 

(1.1) Vulnerability Description:
Daily online websites have a cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Open Redirect (Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards) attacks. During the tests, all Daily mail websites (Daily Mail, Mail on Sunday & Metro media group) use the same mechanism. These websites include dailymail.co.uk, thisismoney.co.uk, and mailonsunday.co.uk.

 

 

dailymail_1

thisismoney_1

 

 

 

Google Dork:
“Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group”

 

 

The vulnerability occurs at “&targetUrl” parameter in “logout.html?” page, i.e.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/registration/logout.html?targetUrl=http%3A%2F%2Fgoogle.com

 

 

 

(1.2.1) Use the following tests to illustrate the scenario painted above.

The redirected webpage address is “http://diebiyi.com/articles“. Can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

 

 

(1.2.2) The program code flaw can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (9 9.0.8112.16421) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (37.0.2) & Google Chromium 42.0.2311 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04.2),and Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X v10.9 Mavericks.

These bugs were found by using URFDS (Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards Detection System).

 

 

 

(1.2) Description of Open Redirect:
Here is the description of Open Redirect: “A web application accepts a user-controlled input that specifies a link to an external site, and uses that link in a Redirect. This simplifies phishing attacks. An http parameter may contain a URL value and could cause the web application to redirect the request to the specified URL. By modifying the URL value to a malicious site, an attacker may successfully launch a phishing scam and steal user credentials. Because the server name in the modified link is identical to the original site, phishing attempts have a more trustworthy appearance.” (From CWE)

 

 

 

(1.3) Vulnerability Disclosure:
These vulnerabilities have not been patched.

 

 

 

 

(2) Daily Mail Website XSS Cyber Security Zero-Day Vulnerability

(2.1) Vulnerability description:
DailyMail has a security problem. Criminals can exploit it by XSS attacks.

The vulnerability occurs at “reportAbuseInComment.html?” page with “&commentId” parameter, i.e.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/reportAbuseInComment.html?articleId=346288&commentId=877038

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Mozilla Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and Microsoft IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.

dailymail_uk_xss




(2.2) What is XSS?
“Cross-site scripting (XSS) is a type of computer security vulnerability typically found in web applications. XSS enables attackers to inject client-side script into web pages viewed by other users. A cross-site scripting vulnerability may be used by attackers to bypass access controls such as the same-origin policy. Cross-site scripting carried out on websites accounted for roughly 84% of all security vulnerabilities documented by Symantec as of 2007. Their effect may range from a petty nuisance to a significant security risk, depending on the sensitivity of the data handled by the vulnerable site and the nature of any security mitigation implemented by the site’s owner.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

(2.3) Vulnerability Disclosure:
This vulnerability has been patched.

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing

 

 

 

 

Godaddy Web Service Covert Redirect Security Bugs Based on Google.com

StudyShare_GoDaddy2

 

Godaddy Online Website Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Google.com

 

(1) Domain:
godaddy.com

 

 

“GoDaddy is a publicly traded Internet domain registrar and web hosting company. As of 2014, GoDaddy was said to have had more than 59 million domain names under management, making it the world’s largest ICANN-accredited registrar. It serves more than 12 million customers and employs more than 4,000 people. The company is known for its celebrity spokespeople, Super Bowl ads and as being an online provider for small businesses. In addition to a postseason college football bowl game, it sponsors NASCAR. It has been involved in several controversies related to security and privacy. In addition to domain registration and hosting, GoDaddy also sells e-business related software and services.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

(2) Vulnerability Description:
Godaddy web application has a computer security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect cyber attacks.


The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

 

The vulnerability occurs at “redirect.aspx?” page with “&target” parameter, i.e.
http://img.godaddy.com/redirect.aspx?ci=1161&target=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com

 

 

 

(2.1) When a user is redirected from Godaddy to another site, Godaddy will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains Godaddy’s whitelist, e.g.
google.com
apple.com

 

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Godaddy to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Godaddy directly.

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
google.com

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://diebiyi.com/articles/“. Can suppose that this page is malicious.

 

Vulnerable URL:
http://img.godaddy.com/redirect.aspx?ci=1161&target=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.godaddy.com

 

POC:
http://img.godaddy.com/redirect.aspx?ci=1161&target=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2Faccounts%2FLogout%3Fservice%3Dwise%26continue%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fgoogleads.g.doubleclick.net%252Faclk%253Fsa%253DL%2526ai%253DCtHoIVxn3UvjLOYGKiAeelIHIBfLQnccEAAAQASAAUNTx5Pf4_____wFgvwWCARdjYS1wdWItMDQ2NjU4MjEwOTU2NjUzMsgBBOACAKgDAaoE5AFP0NHr5cHwFmWgKNs6HNTPVk7TWSV-CDHX83dKdGSWJ2ADoZNIxUHZwjAODRyDY_7nVtpuqSLOTef4xzVxDQ2U22MNbGak33Ur7i2jDB8LdYt9TbC3ifsXmklY5jl3Zpq4_lP7wagVfjt0–tNPPGTR96NGbxgPvfHMq9ZsTXpjhc_lPlnyGjlWzF8yn437iaxhGRwYLt_CymifLO2YaJPkCm9nLpONtUM-mstUSpKQrP2VjjaZkbDtuK0naLLBV37aYEY4TzWQi8fQGN47z4XgpinBCna91zQayZjn2wxccDCl0zgBAGgBhU%2526num%253D0%2526sig%253DAOD64_3Qi4qG3CRVHRI5AHSkSGuL7HJqSA%2526client%253Dca-pub-0466582109566532%2526adurl%253Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.tetraph.com%252Fcontact.html

 

 

 

Blog Detail:
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/05/godaddy-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html



 

 

 

(3) What is Covert Redirect?
Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS (Cross-site Scripting) vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on, such as OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect can work together with CSRF (Cross-site Request Forgery) as well.

 

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore.
(@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/








Related Articles:
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/559167679353720834
http://tetraph.com/security/covert-redirect/godaddy-covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on-google/
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/234603051201444111919171/
http://whitehatpost.lofter.com/post/1cc773c8_706b6bf
http://japanbroad.blogspot.jp/2015/06/godaddy-bug.html
http://securitypost.tumblr.com/post/119439859067/itinfotech-id-oauth
https://infoswift.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/godaddy-hack/
http://germancast.blogspot.de/2014/06/godaddy-exploit.html
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/covert-redirect/godaddy-covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on-google/
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2014/07/07/godaddy-hacking/

The New York Times(Nytimes.com) Covert Redirect Web Security Bug Based on Google Doubleclick.net

New-York-Times-office

(1) WebSite:

nytimes.com



“The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851, by the New York Times Company. It has won 117 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization.

 

The paper’s print version has the largest circulation of any metropolitan newspaper in the United States, and the second-largest circulation overall, behind The Wall Street Journal. It is ranked 39th in the world by circulation. Following industry trends, its weekday circulation has fallen to fewer than one million daily since 1990. Nicknamed for years as “The Gray Lady”, The New York Times is long regarded within the industry as a national “newspaper of record”. It is owned by The New York Times Company. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr., (whose family (Ochs-Sulzberger) has controlled the paper for five generations, since 1896), is both the paper’s publisher and the company’s chairman. Its international version, formerly the International Herald Tribune, is now called the International New York Times.” (Wikipedia)

 

(2) Vulnerability Description:

The New York Times web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.



The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

The programming code flaw occurs at “adx_click.html?” page with “&goto” parameter, i.e.

http://www.nytimes.com/adx/bin/adx_click.html?type=goto&opzn&page=www.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.html&pos=SFMiddle&sn2=8dfce1f6/9926f9b3&sn1=bbba504f/c0de9221&camp=CouplesResorts_1918341&ad=NYRegionSF_Feb_300x250-B5732328.10663001&goto=http%3A%2F%2Fad%2Edoubleclick%2Enet%2Fddm%2Fclk%2F279541164%3B106630011%3Bs%3Fhttp%3A%2F%2Ffacebook%2Ecom%2Fall%2Dinclusive%2Ephp%3Futm%5Fsource%3Dnyt%26utm%5Fmedium%3Ddisplay%26utm%5Fcontent%3Dclicktracker%26utm%5Fcampaign%3D300x250%5FExpectMore%5FNYT%5FNYRegion

 

 

 

 

 

(2.1) When a user is redirected from Nytimes to another site, Nytimes will check parameters “&sn1″ and “&sn2″. If the redirected URL’s domain is OK, Nytimes will allow the reidrection.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Nytimes to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Nytimes directly.

 

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad website)

 

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one of webpages for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://xingti.tumblr.com”. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

 

 

Vulnerable URL:
http://www.nytimes.com/adx/bin/adx_click.html?type=goto&opzn&page=www.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.html&pos=SFMiddle&sn2=8dfce1f6/9926f9b3&sn1=bbba504f/c0de9221&camp=CouplesResorts_1918341&ad=NYRegionSF_Feb_300x250-B5732328.10663001&goto=http%3A%2F%2Fad%2Edoubleclick%2Enet%2Fddm%2Fclk%2F279541164%3B106630011%3Bs%3Fhttp%3A%2F%2Ffacebook%2Ecom%2Fall%2Dinclusive%2Ephp%3Futm%5Fsource%3Dnyt%26utm%5Fmedium%3Ddisplay%26utm%5Fcontent%3Dclicktracker%26utm%5Fcampaign%3D300x250%5FExpectMore%5FNYT%5FNYRegion

 

 

 

POC:
http://www.nytimes.com/adx/bin/adx_click.html?type=goto&opzn&page=www.nytimes.com/pages/nyregion/index.html&pos=SFMiddle&sn2=8dfce1f6/9926f9b3&sn1=bbba504f/c0de9221&camp=CouplesResorts_1918341&ad=NYRegionSF_Feb_300x250-B5732328.10663001&goto=http%3A%2F%2Fad%2Edoubleclick%2Enet%2Fddm%2Fclk%2F279541164%3B106630011%3Bs%3Fhttp%3A%2F%2Ftetraph%2Ecom%2Fblog%3F%2Dinclusive%2Ephp%3Futm%5Fsource%3Dnyt%26utm%5Fmedium%3Ddisplay%26utm%5Fcontent%3Dclicktracker%26utm%5Fcampaign%3D300x250%5FExpectMore%5FNYT%5FNYRegion

 

 

 

 

 


Blog Detail:
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/05/nytimes-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html



 

 

 

(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Hacker may use it to steal users’ sensitive information. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

 

 

 

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Covert Redirect Web Security Bugs Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

go

 

Bypass Google Open Redirect Filter Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

— Google Covert Redirect Vulnerability Based on Googleads.g.doubleclick.net

 

 

 

(1) WebSite:
google.com

 

“Google is an American multinational technology company specializing in Internet-related services and products. These include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software. Most of its profits are derived from AdWords, an online advertising service that places advertising near the list of search results.

 

The corporation has been estimated to run more than one million servers in data centers around the world (as of 2007). It processes over one billion search requests and about 24 petabytes of user-generated data each day (as of 2009). In December 2013, Alexa listed google.com as the most visited website in the world. Numerous Google sites in other languages figure in the top one hundred, as do several other Google-owned sites such as YouTube and Blogger. Its market dominance has led to prominent media coverage, including criticism of the company over issues such as search neutrality, copyright, censorship, and privacy.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

(2) Vulnerability Description:

Google web application has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by Covert Redirect attacks.

The vulnerability exists at “Logout?” page with “&continue” parameter, i.e.


The vulnerabilities can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Microsoft IE (10.0.9200.16750) of Windows 8, Mozilla Firefox (34.0) & Google Chromium 39.0.2171.65-0 ubuntu0.14.04.1.1064 (64-bit) of Ubuntu (14.04),Apple Safari 6.1.6 of Mac OS X Lion 10.7.

(2.1) When a user is redirected from Google to another site, Google will check whether the redirected URL belongs to domains in Google’s whitelist (The whitelist usually contains websites belong to Google), e.g.
docs.google.com
googleads.g.doubleclick.net

 

If this is true, the redirection will be allowed.

 

However, if the URLs in a redirected domain have open URL redirection vulnerabilities themselves, a user could be redirected from Google to a vulnerable URL in that domain first and later be redirected from this vulnerable site to a malicious site. This is as if being redirected from Google directly.

 

One of the vulnerable domain is,
googleads.g.doubleclick.net (Google’s Ad System)

 

 

 

(2.2) Use one webpage for the following tests. The webpage address is “http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope“. We can suppose that this webpage is malicious.

Blog Detail:
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on.html

 

 

 

 

 

(3) What is Covert Redirect?

Covert Redirect is a class of security bugs disclosed in May 2014. It is an application that takes a parameter and redirects a user to the parameter value without sufficient validation. This often makes use of Open Redirect and XSS vulnerabilities in third-party applications.

 

Covert Redirect is also related to single sign-on. It is known by its influence on OAuth and OpenID. Almost all OAuth 2.0 and OpenID providers worldwide are affected. Covert Redirect was found and dubbed by a Mathematics PhD student Wang Jing from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

 

After Covert Redirect was published, it is kept in some common databases such as SCIP, OSVDB, Bugtraq, and X-Force. Its scipID is 13185, while OSVDB reference number is 106567. Bugtraq ID: 67196. X-Force reference number is 93031.

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://tetraph.com/wangjing/

 

 

 

 

More Details:
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/11/google-covert-redirect-vulnerability.html
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/29
http://cxsecurity.com/issue/WLB-2014110106
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/23460305120141145350181/
https://infoswift.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/google-web-security/
http://tetraph.tumblr.com/post/119490394042/securitypost#notes
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/11/covert-redirect-vulnerability-based-on.html
http://webtech.lofter.com/post/1cd3e0d3_706af10
https://twitter.com/tetraphibious/status/559165319575371776
http://tetraph.com/security/covert-redirect/google-based-on-googleads-g-doubleclick-net/
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/computer-security/google-covert-g-doubleclick-net/
https://hackertopic.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/google-web-security/

The Weather Channel at Least 76.3% Links Vulnerable to XSS Attacks

 
 

GTY_email_hacker_dm_130718_16x9_608

 

The Weather Channel at Least 76.3% Links Vulnerable to XSS Attacks

 

 

Domain Description:
http://www.weather.com/

 

“The Weather Channel is an American basic cable and satellite television channel which broadcasts weather forecasts and weather-related news and analyses, along with documentaries and entertainment programming related to weather. Launched on May 2, 1982, the channel broadcasts weather forecasts and weather-related news and analysis, along with documentaries and entertainment programming related to weather.”

 

“As of February 2015, The Weather Channel was received by approximately 97.3 million American households that subscribe to a pay television service (83.6% of U.S. households with at least one television set), which gave it the highest national distribution of any U.S. cable channel. However, it was subsequently dropped by Verizon FiOS (losing its approximately 5.5 millions subscribers), giving the title of most distributed network to HLN. Actual viewership of the channel averaged 210,000 during 2013 and has been declining for several years. Content from The Weather Channel is available for purchase from the NBCUniversal Archives.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

Vulnerability description:


The Weather Channel has a cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit it by XSS bugs.

 

Almost all links under the domain weather.com are vulnerable to XSS attacks. Attackers just need to add script at the end of The Weather Channel’s URLs. Then the scripts will be executed.

 

10 thousands of Links were tested based a self-written tool. During the tests, 76.3% of links belong to weather.com were vulnerable to XSS attacks.

 

The reason of this vulnerability is that Weather Channel uses URLs to construct its HTML tags without filtering malicious script codes.

 

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 8.

 

 

 

 

weather_1_xss

 
 

weather_2_xx

 

 

POC Codes, e.g.

http://www.weather.com/slideshows/main/“–/>”><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

http://www.weather.com/home-garden/home/white-house-lawns-20140316%22–/“–/>”><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>t%28%27justqdjing%27%29%3E

http://www.weather.com/news/main/“><img src=x onerror=prompt(‘justqdjing’)>

 

 

The Weather Channel has patched this Vulnerability in late November, 2014 (last Week). “The Full Disclosure mailing list is a public forum for detailed discussion of vulnerabilities and exploitation techniques, as well as tools, papers, news, and events of interest to the community. FD differs from other security lists in its open nature and support for researchers’ right to decide how to disclose their own discovered bugs. The full disclosure movement has been credited with forcing vendors to better secure their products and to publicly acknowledge and fix flaws rather than hide them. Vendor legal intimidation and censorship attempts are not tolerated here!” A great many of the fllowing web securities have been published here, Buffer overflow, HTTP Response Splitting (CRLF), CMD Injection, SQL injection, Phishing, Cross-site scripting, CSRF, Cyber-attack, Unvalidated Redirects and Forwards, Information Leakage, Denial of Service, File Inclusion, Weak Encryption, Privilege Escalation, Directory Traversal, HTML Injection, Spam. This bug was published at The Full Disclosure in November, 2014.

 

 

 

Discovered by:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)

 

 

 

 

More Details:
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Nov/89
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2014/11/27/3
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1253
https://progressive-comp.com/?l=full-disclosure&m=141705578527909&w=1
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/104313615841/the-weather-channel-flaw
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/xss-vulnerability/the-weather-channel-exploit
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/the-weather-channel-bug
http://whitehatpost.lofter.com/post/1cc773c8_6f2d4a8
https://vulnerabilitypost.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/the-weather-channel-flaw
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/234603051201411475314523/
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-weather-channel-xss.html
http://ithut.tumblr.com/post/121916595448/weather-channel-xss
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2014/12/04/the-weather-channel-weather-bug
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/12/the-weather-channel-xss.html
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/xss-vulnerability/the-weather-channel-bug

 

 

 

The New York Times Old Articles Can Be Exploited by XSS Attacks (Almost all Article Pages Before 2013 Are Affected)

 
 

binary_data_illustratio_450

 

Domain:
http://www.nytimes.com/

 

“The New York Times (NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since September 18, 1851, by the New York Times Company. It has won 114 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization. The paper’s print version has the largest circulation of any metropolitan newspaper in the United States, and the second-largest circulation overall, behind The Wall Street Journal. It is ranked 39th in the world by circulation. Following industry trends, its weekday circulation has fallen to fewer than one million daily since 1990. Nicknamed for years as “The Gray Lady”, The New York Times is long regarded within the industry as a national “newspaper of record”. It is owned by The New York Times Company. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Jr., (whose family (Ochs-Sulzberger) has controlled the paper for five generations, since 1896), is both the paper’s publisher and the company’s chairman. Its international version, formerly the International Herald Tribune, is now called the International New York Times. The paper’s motto, “All the News That’s Fit to Print”, appears in the upper left-hand corner of the front page.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

(1) Vulnerability Description:

The New York Times has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can exploit its users by XSS bugs.

 

The code program flaw occurs at New York Times’s URLs. Nytimes (short for New York Times) uses part of the URLs to construct its pages. However, it seems that Nytimes does not filter the content used for the construction at all before 2013.

 

Based on Nytimes’s Design, Almost all URLs before 2013 are affected (All pages of articles). In fact, all article pages that contain “PRINT” button, “SINGLE PAGE” button, “Page *” button, “NEXT PAGE” button are affected.

 

Nytimes changed this mechanism since 2013. It decodes the URLs sent to its server. This makes the mechanism much safer now.

 

However, all URLs before 2013 are still using the old mechanism. This means almost all article pages before 2013 are still vulnerable to XSS attacks. I guess the reason Nytimes does not filter URLs before is cost. It costs too much (money & human capital) to change the database of all posted articles before.

 

 

nytimes_2010_xss

 

nytimes_2011_xss

 

 

 

 

Living POCs Codes:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/sunday-review/big-datas-impact-in-the-world.html//’ “><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/09/travel/09where-to-go.html//’ “><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>?pagewanted=all&_r=0

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/07/opinion/07brooks.html//’ “><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/06/technology/06stats.html//’ “><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/09/dining/091crex.html//’ “><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/14/opinion/lweb14brain.html//’ “><img src=x onerror=prompt(/justqdjing/)>

 

 

 

(2) Vulnerability Analysis:
Take the following link as an example,
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/12/sunday-review/big-datas-impact-in-the-world.html/“><vulnerabletoattack

 

It can see that for the page reflected, it contains the following codes. All of them are vulnerable.

 

<li class=”print”>

<a href=”/2012/02/12/sunday-review/big-datas-impact-in-the-world.html/”><vulnerabletoattack?pagewanted=print”>Print</testtesttest?pagewanted=print”></a>

</li>

 

<li class=”singlePage”>

<a href=”/2012/02/12/sunday-review/big-datas-impact-in-the-world.html/”><testtesttest?pagewanted=all”> Single Page</vulnerabletoattack?pagewanted=all”></a>

</li>

 

<li> <a onclick=”s_code_linktrack(‘Article-MultiPagePageNum2′);” title=”Page 2″ href=”/2012/02/12/sunday-review/big-datas-impact-in-the-world.html/”><vulnerabletoattack?pagewanted=2″>2</testtesttest?pagewanted=2″></a>

</li>

 

<li> <a onclick=”s_code_linktrack(‘Article-MultiPagePageNum3′);” title=”Page 3″ href=”/2012/02/12/sunday-review/big-datas-impact-in-the-world.html/”><vulnerabletoattack?pagewanted=3″>3</testtesttest?pagewanted=3″></a>

</li>

 

<a class=”next” onclick=”s_code_linktrack(‘Article-MultiPage-Next’);” title=”Next Page” href=”/2012/02/12/sunday-review/big-datas-impact-in-the-world.html/”><vulnerabletoattack?pagewanted=2″>Next Page »</testtesttest?pagewanted=2″></a>

 

 

 

 

(3) What is XSS?

Cross-site scripting (XSS) is a type of computer security vulnerability typically found in Web applications. XSS enables attackers to inject client-side script into Web pages viewed by other users. A cross-site scripting vulnerability may be used by attackers to bypass access controls such as the same origin policy.

 

“Hackers are constantly experimenting with a wide repertoire of hacking techniques to compromise websites and web applications and make off with a treasure trove of sensitive data including credit card numbers, social security numbers and even medical records. Cross-site Scripting (also known as XSS or CSS) is generally believed to be one of the most common application layer hacking techniques Cross-site Scripting allows an attacker to embed malicious JavaScript, VBScript, ActiveX, HTML, or Flash into a vulnerable dynamic page to fool the user, executing the script on his machine in order to gather data. The use of XSS might compromise private information, manipulate or steal cookies, create requests that can be mistaken for those of a valid user, or execute malicious code on the end-user systems. The data is usually formatted as a hyperlink containing malicious content and which is distributed over any possible means on the internet.” (Acunetix)

 

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (34.0) in Ubuntu (14.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 8.

 

 

 

Discover and Reporter:
Jing Wang, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)

 

 

 

 

More Details:
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2014/10/16/2
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/xss-vulnerability/new-york-times-xss
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1102
http://webcabinet.tumblr.com/post/121907302752/new-york-times-xss
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/xss-vulnerability/new-york-times-xss
https://progressive-comp.com/?l=full-disclosure&m=141343993908563&w=1
http://webtech.lofter.com/post/1cd3e0d3_6f57c56
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/2346030512014101270479/
https://vulnerabilitypost.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/new-york-times-xss
http://lifegrey.tumblr.com/post/121912534859/tous-les-liens-vers-les-articles
http://securityrelated.blogspot.com/2014/10/new-york-times-design.html
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/new-york-times-xss
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/10/new-york-times-design.html
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/103788276286/urls-to-articles-xss
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/xss-vulnerability/new-york-times-xss

 

 

 

Mozilla Online Website Two Sub-Domains XSS (Cross-site Scripting) Bugs ( All URLs Under the Two Domains)

6864_cTAUHWda_o-600x401

 

 

Domains:
http://lxr.mozilla.org/
http://mxr.mozilla.org/
(The two domains above are almost the same)

 

Websites information:
“lxr.mozilla.org, mxr.mozilla.org are cross references designed to display the Mozilla source code. The sources displayed are those that are currently checked in to the mainline of the mozilla.org CVS server, Mercurial Server, and Subversion Server; these pages are updated many times a day, so they should be pretty close to the latest‑and‑greatest.” (from Mozilla)

“Mozilla is a free-software community which produces the Firefox web browser. The Mozilla community uses, develops, spreads and supports Mozilla products, thereby promoting exclusively free software and open standards, with only minor exceptions. The community is supported institutionally by the Mozilla Foundation and its tax-paying subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. In addition to the Firefox browser, Mozilla also produces Thunderbird, Firefox Mobile, the Firefox OS mobile operating system, the bug tracking system Bugzilla and a number of other projects.” (Wikipedia)

 

 

 

(1) Vulnerability description:
Mozilla website has a computer cyber security problem. Hacker can attack it by XSS bugs. Here is the description of XSS: “Hackers are constantly experimenting with a wide repertoire of hacking techniques to compromise websites and web applications and make off with a treasure trove of sensitive data including credit card numbers, social security numbers and even medical records. Cross-site Scripting (also known as XSS or CSS) is generally believed to be one of the most common application layer hacking techniques Cross-site Scripting allows an attacker to embed malicious JavaScript, VBScript, ActiveX, HTML, or Flash into a vulnerable dynamic page to fool the user, executing the script on his machine in order to gather data. The use of XSS might compromise private information, manipulate or steal cookies, create requests that can be mistaken for those of a valid user, or execute malicious code on the end-user systems. The data is usually formatted as a hyperlink containing malicious content and which is distributed over any possible means on the internet.” (Acunetix)

 

 

All pages under the following two URLs are vulnerable.
http://lxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source
http://mxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source

This means all URLs under the above two domains can be used for XSS attacks targeting Mozilla’s users.

Since there are large number of pages under them. Meanwhile, the contents of the two domains vary. This makes the vulnerability very dangerous. Attackers can use different URLs to design XSS attacks to Mozilla’s variety class of users.

 

 

mozilla_lxr_2_xss

 
 

mozilla_mxr_1_xss

 

 

 

POC Codes:

http://lxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source/<body onload=prompt(“justqdjing”)>

http://mxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source/<body onload=prompt(“justqdjing”)>

http://mxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source/webapprt/<body onload=prompt(“justqdjing”)>

 

(2) Vulnerability Analysis:
Take the following link as an example,
http://lxr.mozilla.org/mozilla-central/source/chrome/<attacktest&gt;

In the page reflected, it contains the following codes.

<a href=”/mozilla-central/source/chrome/%253Cattacktest%253E”>

<attacktest></attacktest>

</a>

If insert “<body onload=prompt(“justqdjing”)>” into the URL, the code can be executed.

The vulnerability can be attacked without user login. Tests were performed on Firefox (26.0) in Ubuntu (12.04) and IE (9.0.15) in Windows 7.

 

 

(3) Vulnerability Disclosure:
The vulnerability have been reported to bugzilla.mozilla.org. Mozilla are dealing with this issue.

 


Discovered and Reported by:
Wang Jing, Division of Mathematical Sciences (MAS), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (SPMS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore. (@justqdjing)
http://www.tetraph.com/wangjing/

 

 

More Details:
http://lists.openwall.net/full-disclosure/2014/10/20/8
http://static-173-79-223-25.washdc.fios.verizon.net/?l=full-disclosure
http://seclists.org/fulldisclosure/2014/Oct/92
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/xss-vulnerability/mozilla-xss
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/101466861221/mozilla-mozilla
http://tetraph.blog.163.com/blog/static/2346030512014101115642885/
http://computerobsess.blogspot.com/2014/10/mozilla-mozillaorg-two-sub-domains.html
https://tetraph.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/mozilla-two-sub-domains-xss
http://tetraph.blogspot.com/2014/10/mozilla-mozillaorg-two-sub-domains.html
http://itsecurity.lofter.com/post/1cfbf9e7_54fc68f
http://whitehatview.tumblr.com/post/103540568486/two-of-mozillas-cross
http://diebiyi.com/articles/security/xss-vulnerability/mozilla-xss
http://www.inzeed.com/kaleidoscope/xss-vulnerability/mozilla-xss
https://mathfas.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/mozilla-xss
http://www.tetraph.com/blog/xss-vulnerability/mozilla-xss
http://permalink.gmane.org/gmane.comp.security.fulldisclosure/1121